teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via.  teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.
Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via. 

teaim:

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.

Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday. Via. 

brooklynmutt:

This afternoon, whoever runs social media for the New York Police Department asked people to tweet out photos of themselves with police officers.

Maybe you can guess what happened next. - The New York Police Department Is Having A Rough Day on Twitter - On The Media

Stranger in a cave. (at 桂林灕江)

MMM
WWW (at 漓江)

This is some sort of perverse genius.

Dvořák - Symphony No. 9 Allegro con fuoco (Official Music Video) (by B-Classic)

“Megachurches and megareligion (a term I use to include televangelism and webcasts that incorporate even more followers into a congregation or movement) incorporate so many elements of business with marketing, advertising, entertaining, congregation studies, etc., that they confuse corporate Christianity and Christianity that is corporate for the larger culture. If a church is using flashy advertising, powerful websites, is selling merch with their logo on it, then it’s acting like a business. And if businesses are promoting a specific religious doctrine and claiming exemption from laws as a result, it’s behaving like a church. They have blended the corporate and Christian beyond earlier permutations and the current religious landscape has allowed for it. This negotiation of corporate/religious boundaries leads to complications: If large organizations that pull in a lot of money are able to have their religious rights protected, then why can’t others? The difference is that some of those large organizations are churches and others are retail stores.”

at 阳朔